Personal Expression – KNZ Clan http://knz-clan.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 02:25:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://knz-clan.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Personal Expression – KNZ Clan http://knz-clan.com/ 32 32 Prayer at school SCOTUS ruling sparks campus religion debate https://knz-clan.com/prayer-at-school-scotus-ruling-sparks-campus-religion-debate/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 02:16:00 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/prayer-at-school-scotus-ruling-sparks-campus-religion-debate/ The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to allow a high school football coach to pray on the field after games is expected to reopen a vigorous and likely tense debate among parents, educators and others about the extent to which religion can penetrate in public schools, California education and legal experts. said Monday. Conservatives and some […]]]>

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to allow a high school football coach to pray on the field after games is expected to reopen a vigorous and likely tense debate among parents, educators and others about the extent to which religion can penetrate in public schools, California education and legal experts. said Monday.

Conservatives and some Christian leaders hailed the court’s action, saying it allowed for the personal religious expression of the coach and those who voluntarily followed him, a reasonable accommodation of religious rights and freedom of speech. expression. But civil liberties advocates and many educators have said allowing a coach or other school authority figure to lead a prayer amounts to the type of establishment of religion prohibited by the Constitution.

“The court has opened the door to prayer in schools more than at any other time in the past 60 years,” said Erwin Chemerinsky, constitutional law expert and dean of the UC Berkeley School of Law. “There will be a lot of litigation. And it is not at all clear where the court will draw the line.

A decision 60 years ago by the High Court to ban formal prayer in New York schools had set a clear line for school officials: that campus practices and policies must have strictly secular purposes. Monday’s decision blurred that line and will invite additional challenges for those who want more room for religious expression in schools, said John Rogers, a UCLA education professor and expert in training school administrators.

“One of the results of this decision is that it’s probably going to open up more conflict in schools,” Rogers said. “This is likely to create more challenges for principals and other district leaders as new efforts are made to bring religion into the public school space. In some school settings, religious minorities or people who are not affiliated with any religion will feel a sense of coercion or a sense of silence or alienation.

Monday’s ruling came in the case of Joe Kennedy, an assistant coach at Bremerton High School in Washington state. Kennedy began kneeling alone at the 50-yard line after games to pray, although the sessions quickly became highly publicized and drew crowds of players and spectators onto the field.

When the prayers became a public event, school officials warned the coach that they could be seen as violating the Constitution’s ban on an “establishment of religion”. Kennedy was suspended when he refused to follow district advice. He was not rehired for the following year.

Lower courts ruled against Kennedy, but the Supreme Court’s conservative majority found the coach’s prayers were protected by two other 1st Amendment provisions – the free speech clause and the ‘free exercise’ clause. of religion.

“The Constitution and the best of our traditions counsel mutual respect and tolerance, not censorship and repression, for religious and non-religious views,” Judge Neil M. Gorsuch wrote for the 6-3 majority.

The court action sparked heated discussion Monday on a Facebook group for parents who support Los Angeles Unified School District teachers and are generally aligned with their union.

A parent applauded Kennedy’s protection of free speech and religious freedom rights, saying the coach never coerced others into joining the prayer sessions. But several other parents objected, saying players and pupils might feel ridiculed or left out if they were among the minority who did not join in the prayers.

Other parents wondered how receptive the High Court would have been to freedom arguments if the coach in question had been a Muslim, who placed a prayer mat in the middle of the pitch and bowed in prayers in front of it. Allah.

“I don’t know if this Supreme Court would make a decision so far if it was a religion other than Christianity,” said Tracy Abbott Cook, one of the parents in the focus group. “And why does this coach have to bring religion into this moment in public? Maybe people want to get away from religion and politics when they go to a sporting event. . . . Why mess it all up?”

Superintendent of Los Angeles Schools. Alberto M. Carvalho said district policy already made it clear that employees were allowed to pray, but at their own pace and in their place. The district prohibits prayers that would inspire students to join, Carvalho said.

“Insofar as you engage in prayer, on your own, outside of reality [school] event – ​​and you didn’t compel anyone to accompany you in prayer – then this is in the guardrails of free speech, which you don’t lose when you enter a public school. he said. “If it goes beyond that, it will continue to not be allowed.”

But even in the nation’s second-largest school district, it seemed clear that those guidelines weren’t being consistently followed.

Football coaches at three LA Unified high schools said they were aware of rules requiring separation of religion and school duties, though they said players sometimes led prayers informally, sometimes in small groups.

Stafon Johnson, football coach at Dorsey High, said he regularly leads prayers just before and after games. “I’m just praying for their comfort, I’m praying for… injury-free, I’m praying for the other teams so they can travel safely,” said Johnson, who said he finds training brings comfort. to players.

He said he referred to “God” in his prayers but saw it as a universal term and that Muslim players and coaches “participated in their own way”.

Carvalho said he should know the details of Dorsey High’s prayer sessions, but they seemed “inconsistent” with district policy.

Ken Williams, an administrator for the Orange County school board, applauded the court for its decision, saying celebrating religious diversity and expressions of faith are central to American identity.

“I totally understand that you can’t force someone to pray or believe the same things that I believe,” said Williams, a Christian. “I think it’s very American, but I also think religion is important. This nation was founded by men of religious faith.

In the Clovis Unified School District of Central Valley, board member Steven Fogg said he would support a policy change to allow teachers and coaches to lead prayers at sporting events. The district previously only allowed students to lead prayers.

The district had for years opened school board meetings with a prayer, a routine interrupted after a federal appeals court ruled against the practice in 2018 in a case involving a Chino Valley school board.

“I hope people are not threatened by prayer. They shouldn’t be,” said Fogg, who is a Mormon. “Prayer should not be something that brings animosity, otherwise it is false prayer. We certainly don’t want anyone to feel left out. It should be something that brings people together. »

But lawyers who had opposed organized prayer on school grounds said the practice tended to become coercive and exclusive when directed by coaches and other authority figures. The ACLU of Washington noted that one of Kennedy’s players participated in the prayer against his own beliefs for fear of wasting playing time if he refused.

“This decision strains the separation of church and state — a fundamental tenet of our democracy — and potentially harms our youth,” said Taryn Darling, senior counsel for the ACLU of Washington.

“Some parties see a political game in making our public schools the scene of conflict,” said Rogers of UCLA. “And I think that’s to the detriment of public schools, which require some level of common purpose in order to advance our common interest in developing the abilities of young people to serve the wider community.”

Monday’s ruling did not overturn previous court rulings that barred more direct intrusions of religion into the curriculum and the school day.

In 1962, the High Court ruled in Engel v Vitale that the New York Board of Regents could not impose a prayer on students. The court rejected the New York educators’ proposal, even though they argued that their one-sentence prayer was non-denominational.

Judge Huge Black found that the simple opening prayer (“Almighty God, we acknowledge our dependence on you, and we ask for your blessings upon us, our parents, our teachers, and our country. Amen.”) was, by its very nature sufficient to constitute an unlawful establishment of religion, even if participation in prayer was not overtly coerced.

In subsequent decades, the Supreme Court rejected an Alabama law allowing one minute of prayer or meditation during the school day and banned prayers led by religious leaders at graduation ceremonies. In 2000, the court also rejected a Texas school board policy that allowed students to decide, by majority vote, whether they wanted to have a student-led “invocation” at football games, graduations and other school gatherings.

“Constitutionally protected religious liberty is restricted when the state affirmatively sponsors the particular religious practice of prayer,” Judge John Paul Stevens said in the 6-3 opinion quashing the school’s prayer plan. . Stephen Breyer is the only remaining judge on the court who concurred with this opinion. He is expected to retire this summer.

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Marina Warner sees the myths of our moment https://knz-clan.com/marina-warner-sees-the-myths-of-our-moment/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 10:03:28 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/marina-warner-sees-the-myths-of-our-moment/ Marina Warner, English writer, lecturer and former president of the Royal Society of Literature, is an authority on things that don’t exist. Magical spells, monstrous beasts, pregnant virgins – if the imagination can conjure it up, she probably wrote about it in one of her nearly forty books, which mine myths, folk and fairy tales […]]]>

Marina Warner, English writer, lecturer and former president of the Royal Society of Literature, is an authority on things that don’t exist. Magical spells, monstrous beasts, pregnant virgins – if the imagination can conjure it up, she probably wrote about it in one of her nearly forty books, which mine myths, folk and fairy tales and religious texts to the human truths they reveal. The work offers convulsions of associative surprise: Oedipus, who goes blind after sleeping with his mother, is linked to the sandman of the nursery rhyme, who sprinkles dust in the eyes of children to punish forbidden desires. In Warner’s Hall of Mirrors, it’s impossible to predict which face – that of Scheherazade, that of Jorge Luis Borges, that of Derek Walcott – might pass next.

Warner, a regular contributor to The New York Book Review and the London book review, is no stranger to controversy. “Alone of all his sex“, her study of the cult of the Virgin Mary, enraged Catholic conservatives with her feminist arguments, and she published blistering trials on how market ideologies distort academia. (In 2014 she wrote that she felt expelled from her professorship at the University of Essex after protested treatment of faculty by the school.) She also wrote short fiction films and novels. “the lost father”, which examines the situation of Italian women under fascism, was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1988 and draws on Warner’s own ancestry. Her mother, Ilia, grew up in Bari and met Warner’s father when his regiment was deployed to Italy in 1944. Shortly after Marina’s birth in 1946, the family moved from London to Cairo, where a cosmopolitan elite flourished in a context of resistance to the West. (Another novel, “IndigoAfter the Cairo fire in 1952, in which Egyptian revolutionaries burned down hundreds of foreign businesses, including the Warners bookstore, the family decamped to Belgium and then to Cambridge. “Esmond and Ilia: an unreliable memoir(New York Review Books), Warner’s first comprehensive autobiographical work, is out this month, and it traces both the early years of his parents’ union and the residue of his oldest memories.

To read Warner’s writings is to appreciate how the stories, persisting for thousands of years, shape and are shaped by the societies that tell them. Her ability to unravel the hidden relevance of a stock character makes her a sought-after commentator on modern politics, gender relations, and internet culture. And her willingness to listen when a tale’s message is unpalatable — when Mother Goose spews misogyny, say, rather than sibling empowerment — sets her apart from a crop of scholars who seek to put our collective dreams and nightmares in the service of ideology. I recently spoke to Warner about myths, #MeToo and his memory trick. Our conversation has been edited for clarity.

As a mythographer, you study the roots of all stories. Do you often have “Aha!” » moments while reading the news? “It’s like Ulysses and the Sirens. . . .

It’s not enough as one to one. I constantly marvel at how the vicissitudes of human existence are covered in these very ancient texts. It’s really quite strange that people from so long ago seem to have understood so much. And, if you look at things like sex, it’s amazing: there’s hardly a permutation that hasn’t been shrouded in myth. They knew everything.

I remember once hearing John Berger give a lecture. It was about art, and it took place in a disused London Underground station. And we went all the way down, and as we did, he took us down a timeline of art. At first we looked at Renaissance portraits, then we looked at Egyptian mummies, then we went to the bottom and lay on the platforms like the figures in Henry Moore’s drawings of people sheltering from the Blitz . And Berger came down from the tunnel – he was a very charismatic man with an amazing voice, and his voice came out of the tunnel. He said, “At first there was no trial and error.” He was talking about cave paintings, the first paintings we have. There is something similar in literature: at the beginning, there was no trial and error. “Gilgamesh” is very rich in psychology, on death, on friendship, on love between men and on monsters. And the Iliad, the Odyssey, as you said. These works are inexhaustible.

Is there a story or myth that you think particularly illuminates the present moment?

I guess the stories I like shine a light on cruelty. Scenes that warn against paying attention to people’s inner worlds. A story that has obsessed me for a long time is that of Callisto, seduced by Jupiter. He poses as the goddess Diana, to whom Callisto, as a nymph, is dedicated. When Callisto becomes pregnant, Diana throws her out, and she is persecuted and despised. This particular triangle of deception and cruelty is illuminating.

And the way she was not listened to. There was no pity for her. So I guess the lesson is that we need to listen to people’s stories of what happened to them. And then, of course, there’s also a very strong #MeToo element to Jupiter’s deception. He is in a position of power and destroys someone powerless, and seems completely unrepentant.

Several years ago, you offered an amazing reading of Rapunzel’s story. You watched the beginning, in which a pregnant woman craves the parsley growing in a witch’s garden so badly that she steals it, and the witch punishes her by taking her baby away. The baby grows up and becomes Rapunzel, the girl with long hair who is locked in a tower. I’m thinking about history now because our Supreme Court seems poised to overturn Roe v. Wade. [On Friday, the Court overturned Roe.]

Yes, I had read a book called “The Poison Principleby Gail Bell, whose grandfather was guilty of murder by poison. The author mentioned in passing that parsley was an abortifacient and poisonous in large quantities. It hit me like absolute love at first sight. It’s not uncommon for fairy tales to be meaningless – that’s part of their charm, part of their power. But, in this case, why would the mother want this particular herb and would not mind giving it to her child? This is how I understood: that the story showed a buried lesson, both about the necessity of abortion and the dangers of seeking or obtaining one. And, of course, you also have the witch, which perhaps offers insight into childless women who want children. The story therefore presents a double encounter of need.

In 1994, you gave a series of lectures on “Deal with monstersoutlining six tropes you’ve found pervasive in contemporary life: the evil mother, the male warrior, the innocent child, the cannibal, and more. Have your thoughts on any of these guys evolved since then?

Well, they all continued to thrive in a weird way. I am always quite proud of these conferences. I’m rather surprised that they haven’t been fully retired—it’s a bit alarming. What is interesting about the evil mother is that it is now a subject of female work. There are many writings by women about their mother’s oppressive role in their lives. I’d be interested in revisiting the theme, actually, because I was first drawn to studying fairy tales because there was so much misogyny in them. The same is true of myths. And I wondered why that was so, because it seemed to me that it was also a feminine form, a kind of writing or storytelling very much associated with women. Why were the women writing and speaking against each other in these stories? And I think that’s an interesting thing that we could continue to explore.

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Puma launches into NFTs and digital sneakers https://knz-clan.com/puma-launches-into-nfts-and-digital-sneakers/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 17:30:25 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/puma-launches-into-nfts-and-digital-sneakers/ Puma has just announced its biggest leap into the metaverse. In partnership with 10KTF, an online NFT store run by fictional character Wagmi-San, the lifestyle brand is bringing its apparel to the digital sphere. Puma teased the project a few weeks ago on Twitter – and soon changed its name to Puma.Eth” – but the […]]]>

Puma has just announced its biggest leap into the metaverse. In partnership with 10KTF, an online NFT store run by fictional character Wagmi-San, the lifestyle brand is bringing its apparel to the digital sphere. Puma teased the project a few weeks ago on Twitter – and soon changed its name to Puma.Eth” – but the speculation was confirmed during NFT NYC this week.

What’s coming — Brands everywhere are realizing the massive appeal of Web3, NFTs and the Metaverse, especially in terms of digital fashion. Adam Petrick, Puma Brand Manager Told Business in vogue that Puma “as a sports company [has] thinking about connecting with people in the physical world and empowering people to bring physical products into the digital world. Even a tangible product like a basketball shoe can have athletic capabilities in the digital world, he explained.

The new partnership will bring digital sneakers, NFT collections, and more, giving fans the ability to personalize their experiences. While there aren’t many ideas yet for what the apparel and digital assets will look like, Petrick says Puma wants to give users a space free from physical limitations and open to personal expression.

Puma and 10KTF will soon announce more details about their collaboration.Puma

Can the Puma compete? — That’s not to say Puma doesn’t have its fair share of competition. Big brands like Nike and Adidas are already deep enough in their contributions to the metaverse, and the excitement for Puma’s digital entry is probably best reserved for those who would choose the brand over other IRLs. Business in vogue reported that Puma’s $7.7 billion in revenue in 2021 is behind Nike’s $44.5 billion and Adidas’ $25 billion in the same year, which means it’s safe to say that this is still not the number one choice of the average consumer.

Still, Petrick is enthusiastic about the project and anticipates the brand to be a relevant and inclusive contributor to the space. “Right now our goal is to explore that and try to be as authentic as possible and help people learn along the way,” he said. “I know there’s a big investment in the competition, and it’s not necessarily something we’ve done.”

In the world of Cryptokicks, metaverse fragrances and “Gucci Town”, I hope Puma’s brilliant ideas can cut through the noise.

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The read and write program will be overhauled | Local News https://knz-clan.com/the-read-and-write-program-will-be-overhauled-local-news/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/the-read-and-write-program-will-be-overhauled-local-news/ School administrators are placing a renewed emphasis on the teaching of English and Language Arts (ELA) in Foxboro classrooms based on the findings of a comprehensive curriculum review presented to school committee members the week last. Recommendations developed by a panel of educators and adopted June 14 by school board members involve spending $120,000 on […]]]>

School administrators are placing a renewed emphasis on the teaching of English and Language Arts (ELA) in Foxboro classrooms based on the findings of a comprehensive curriculum review presented to school committee members the week last.

Recommendations developed by a panel of educators and adopted June 14 by school board members involve spending $120,000 on a new program to improve reading and writing skills for students at all grades.

Full implementation of the modified curriculum and teaching methodology is expected to take two years, officials said.

The actions followed a lengthy review process led by Shannon Wasilewski, head of the English department at Foxboro High School, and Karen MacKinnon, director of the K-8 ELA social studies program.

The panel’s findings were heavily influenced by teacher surveys conducted at the elementary, middle, and high school levels, as well as visits to providers presenting different program options.

According to MacKinnon, the majority of elementary school teachers surveyed indicated that they currently have insufficient resources to provide appropriate writing instruction – feedback reinforced by third-grade MCAS scores.

“The responses have been amazing – super thoughtful,” she said. “The teachers really took a lot of time for the open-ended questions, which was really helpful for us.”

After analyzing teacher feedback and other data, MacKinnon said she made the following recommendations on behalf of the review board:

  • Introduce a different and more structured approach to writing;
  • Strengthen the teaching of phonetics in kindergarten and 1st grade;
  • Emphasize pedagogical coherence between the three elementary schools and also during the transition from elementary to middle school;
  • Realign “project-based learning” practices at the secondary level with the core curriculum and a wider range of resources and books.

On a practical level, the review panel also recommended expanding the basic literacy blocks to two hours and creating resources that support reading and writing skills.

While she called the planned changes a significant undertaking, MacKinnon said classroom teachers — some of whom have been on vendor tours — have responded enthusiastically.

“Change is hard and that first year might be a little complicated,” she said. “But we’re going to try to put some of that professional development in place and then embed it throughout the year.”

Deputy Superintendent Alison Mello explained that elementary and middle school teachers will meet in August for professional development days to introduce the new curriculum, with high school teachers primarily engaged in online training.

“People are really invested in it,” Mello said of core teachers. “They’re hungry for it and excited for the change.”

According to Wasilewski, project-based learning at the high school level should incorporate a wider range of resources, and books are needed to stimulate student engagement with texts relevant to different races, cultures, genders, abilities and perspectives.

“We have also found that we need to increase the variety of texts we offer our students, to ensure that they see not only themselves, but also others through the texts they read,” she said.

Project-based learning encourages students to identify and research real-world problems before writing a paper and presenting their own recommendations outlining potential solutions.

The approach, more conventionally applied to STEM-related courses, has already been introduced in some advanced high school language courses, Wasilewski said.

“The focus is really on building skills in a project that allows students to have a voice and answer questions they have themselves,” she said. “These authentic skills are really going to help our students succeed, not just in high school, but also out of high school, and that’s one of our goals in the English department.”

Visual Arts Curriculum Review

School board members also heard last week from educators involved in a parallel review of the visual arts curriculum, in part to update local offerings to incorporate state framework standards formally adopted in 2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dotting her presentation with numerous visuals of student artwork, K-12 Department Head Kelly Arcacha urged board members to think of art education, “not just as a space where we do beautiful things, but a place that fosters innovation and is a gateway to learning in other content areas.

Like the ELA curriculum review, the visual arts process also relied heavily on survey data – although in this case it was 2nd graders. , 4th, 7th, 8th graders and high school students engaged in teaching the visual arts – as well as some parents and even former students, giving their opinion.

Elementary school art teachers Linda Scotland and Clara Schuster said the K-4 findings call for better continuity of artistic vocabulary, continued focus on studio habits and the development of transferable skills, and expanding the reach of voices and cultures to provide more opportunities for personal relationships.

“Art is not something we copy or learn, art is self-expression,” Schuster said.

Recommendations at the college level include adopting letter grades for fifth and sixth graders (current practice is a pass/fail system for 5th and 6th graders with letter grades for 7th and 8th graders year), offering a wider range of elective art courses and the introduction of an annual school-wide collaborative arts project focusing on current affairs and social issues.

“We try to take this inherently subjective course and make it as objective as possible,” said Grade 7 and 8 art teacher Stephen Doherty of the unique approach to letter grading.

Sheri Polseno, a high school pottery and sculpture teacher, said enrollment in art classes has increased, particularly in pottery classes, by overloading pottery wheels, kilns and other equipment.

As a result, recommendations include updating the school’s 3D Studio classroom to accommodate increased enrollment, increasing the procurement budget by 20%, reviving an art exhibit based on high school building and the recertification of two instructors to teach AP art classes.

Finally, Arcacha suggested creating an art promotion organization to help promote school art exhibits, student achievement, and other department events.

Told that a formal vote would be needed to pass changes to the grades 5-6 report card, committee member Richard Pearson suggested tabling the issue before revisiting it over the course of the next few months. ‘summer.

“I think it would be worth looking into as a whole for fifth and sixth grade scoring,” Pearson said. “I don’t know why we have to speed up tonight.”

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Hitting the books: what life on the internet was like at 300 bits per second https://knz-clan.com/hitting-the-books-what-life-on-the-internet-was-like-at-300-bits-per-second/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 14:01:35 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/hitting-the-books-what-life-on-the-internet-was-like-at-300-bits-per-second/ As painful as it sounds, our world existed before social media. They were interesting times with barely a dimly lit portion of the Cheesecake Factory dishes to criticize, exactly zero epic no shortage of laughs, and not an adorable paw bean available to ogle. There weren’t even daily main characters! We lived like low-bandwidth savages, […]]]>

As painful as it sounds, our world existed before social media. They were interesting times with barely a dimly lit portion of the Cheesecake Factory dishes to criticize, exactly zero epic no shortage of laughs, and not an adorable paw bean available to ogle. There weren’t even daily main characters! We lived like low-bandwidth savages, huddled around the soft glow of CRT monitors and our cackling, crackling signal modulators, blissfully unaware of the societal upheaval this new-fangled Internet would bring.

In his new book, The modern world: a prehistory of social mediaauthor and assistant professor in the Department of Media Studies at the University of Virginia, Kevin Driscoll examines the golden days of the early days of the Internet – even before AOL Online – when BBS was king, WiFi wasn’t even a notion, and the speed of electronic thought topped out at 300 baud.

Yale University Press

Extract of The modern world: a prehistory of social media by Kevin Driscoll. Published by Yale University Press. Copyright © 2022 by Kevin Driscoll. All rights reserved.


In the beginning, the heartbeat of the modern world pulsed at a constant rate of 300 bits per second. Streams of binary digits traveled over the telephone network in chunks of 7 and 8 bits, or “bytes,” and each byte corresponded to a single character of text. The typical home computer, hooked up to a fuzzy CRT monitor, could only display a thousand characters at a time, organized in forty columns and twenty-four rows. At 300 bits per second, or 300 “baud”, filling the entire screen took about thirty seconds. Text appeared faster than if someone was typing in real time, but it wasn’t instantaneous.

In the late 1970s, the speed at which data traveled through dial-up networks followed a specification published by Ma Bell nearly two decades earlier. Created in the early 1960s, the AT&T Data-Phone system introduced a reliable technique for two-way machine-to-machine communication over consumer telephone lines. Although Data-Phone was initially sold to large corporations to facilitate communication between various offices and a single data center, it quickly became a de facto standard for commercial time-sharing services, databases online and amateur telecommunications projects. In 1976, Lee Felsenstein of the People’s Computer Company designed a DIY modem kit that offered compatibility with the AT&T system for less than $100. And when new technology companies like Hayes Microcomputer Products in Atlanta and US Robotics in Chicago began selling modems for the personal computer market, they assured consumers of their compatibility with the “Bell 103” standard. Rather than competing on speed, these companies sold hobbyist consumers “smart” features like auto-answer, auto-dial, and programmable “remote control” modes. A 1980 advertisement for the US Robotics Phone Link acoustic modem emphasized its warranty, diagnostic features, and high-end aesthetics: “Sleek…Quiet…Reliable.”

To survive, early PC modem manufacturers had to sell more than modems.

They had to sell the value of being online. Networking is central to the personal computing experience today. Can you imagine a laptop without Wi-Fi? — but in the late 1970s, computer owners still didn’t see their machines as communication devices. Against this conventional view, upstart modem manufacturers presented their products as gateways to a fundamentally different form of computing. Like the personal computer itself, modems were marketed as transformative technologies, consumer electronics that could change your life. Novation, the first player in this rhetorical game, promised that its iconic black modem, the Cat, would “tie you to the world”. Hayes was quick to adopt similar language, describing the Micromodem II as a breakthrough technology that would “open up your Apple II to the outside world”. Never mind that these “worlds” did not yet exist in 1979. Modem marketing evoked a desirable vision of the near future, designed specifically for computer enthusiasts. Instead of driving to an office park or taking the train, modem owners would be the first truly autonomous information workers: telecommuting for meetings, connecting to remote databases and exchanging files with other “computer scientists” around the world. According to Novation, the potential uses for a modem like the Cat were “endless”.

In practice, 300 bits per second didn’t seem slow. In fact, the range of online services available to microcomputer owners in 1980 was quite astonishing, considering how few they were. A Bell-compatible modem like the Pennywhistle or Novation Cat offered access to searchable databases like Dialog and Dow Jones, as well as communications services like CompuServe and The Source. Despite the hype, microcomputers alone can sometimes seem underwhelming to audiences primed with visions of all-powerful, superhuman “world brains.” Yet, as one Byte contributor recounted, the experience of using an online “information search” service was like consulting an electronic oracle. The oracle accepted queries on virtually any subject – “from aardvarks to zymurgia” – and responses seemed instantaneous. “What is your time worth? asked another Byte writer, comparing the scope and speed of an online database to a “well-stocked public library.” Also, exploring the electronic databases was fun. A Dialog representative compared finding his system to an “adventure” and joked that it was “much less frustrating” than the computer game of the same name. Indeed, many early modem owners came to believe that searching for information online would be the killer application propelling computer ownership into the mainstream.

Yet it was not access to other machines but access to other people that ultimately led to the adoption of telephone modems by personal computer owners. Just as email nurtured a sense of community among ARPANET researchers and time-sharing brought thousands of Minnesota teachers and students to collaborate, dial-up modems helped catalyze a growing network of enthusiasts. of microcomputers. While users of time-sharing networks tended to access a mainframe through a “dumb” terminal, users of microcomputer networks often typed on a microcomputer themselves. In other words, there was a symmetry between users and hosts of microcomputer networks. The same device – a microcomputer and a modem – used to connect to a BBS could be reused to host one. Microcomputers were more expensive than simple terminals, but they were much cheaper than the minicomputers deployed in contemporary time-sharing environments.

Like many fans and enthusiasts, computer enthusiasts were eager to connect with others who shared their passion for hands-on technology. News and information about telephone networks spread through the pre-existing network of regional computer clubs, fairs, newsletters and magazines. In early 1979, a first wave of modem owners met on bulletin board systems like CBBS in Chicago and ABBS in San Diego to talk about their hobby. In a 1981 article for InfoWorld, Craig Vaughan, creator of ABBS, described those early years as a wake-up call: “Suddenly everyone was talking about modems, what they’d read on this or that bulletin board, or which alternatives Bell…was the most reliable for long distance data communication. By 1982, hundreds of BBSes were operating across North America, and the topics of discussion were expanding beyond the computer hobby itself. Comparing the participatory culture of BBSes to amateur radio, Vaughan argued that modems transformed the computer from a business tool into a means of personal expression. Slow connection speeds haven’t slowed the spread of the modern world.

True to the original “computerized bulletin board” metaphor, all early BBSs provided two main functions: read old messages or post a new message. At this protean stage, the distinction between “files” and “messages” could be quite blurred. In a 1983 manual for BBS software developers, Lary Myers describes three types of files available to users: messages, bulletins, and downloads. While all three were stored and transmitted as sequences of ASCII characters, Myers singled out “the message file” as the defining feature of BBS. Available day and night, the message file provided an “electronic cork board” for the caller community: a place to post announcements, queries, or comments “for the good of all.” Myers’ sample routine, written in BASIC, identified each message with a unique number and stored all messages on the system in a single random-access file. A comment in Myers’ code suggested that eighty messages would be a reasonable maximum for systems running on a TRS-80. A caller from such a system would request messages by typing numbers on their keypad, and the system would retrieve the corresponding sequence of characters from the message file. New messages were appended to the end of the message file, and when the maximum number of messages was reached, the system simply overwrote the old ones. Like flyers on a corkboard, messages on a BBS weren’t meant to stay on indefinitely.

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A new student movement wants you to go offline https://knz-clan.com/a-new-student-movement-wants-you-to-go-offline/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 21:37:00 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/a-new-student-movement-wants-you-to-go-offline/ Millennials may have been the first generation to come of age online, but their Gen Z successors have truly grown with it — and hardly ever go online. A 2018 Pew Research Center survey found that 95% of adolescents have access to a smartphone; 45% say they use the Internet almost constantly. For many of […]]]>

Millennials may have been the first generation to come of age online, but their Gen Z successors have truly grown with it — and hardly ever go online.

A 2018 Pew Research Center survey found that 95% of adolescents have access to a smartphone; 45% say they use the Internet almost constantly. For many of them, social media has been a space for self-expression, entertainment and connection.

But as social media use has increased among teens, the rates of the Depression, anxiety and suicide. Although the relationship is not directly correlational, there is evidence that some platforms have exacerbated youth mental health issues; for example, Facebook internal research documents, leaked to The Wall Street Journal by whistleblower Frances Haugen, showed that Instagram made body image issues worse for one in three teenage girls.

A March 2022 study published in the scientific journal Nature found that the relationship between social media use and mental health varied by age, but there were two windows where social media use was more likely to have a negative effect on adolescent well-being: at the onset of puberty and again around age 19.

Emma Lembke, a sophomore at Washington University in St. Louis, experienced these negative effects firsthand. That’s why she started the Disconnect movement in June 2020. The project aims to stimulate dialogue between young people who feel the harmful effects of social media and wish to adjust their relationship to it.

In a phone interview, 19-year-old Ms Lembke spoke about the movement she started, the pros and cons of social media and how she worked to loosen its grip on her wellbeing. The interview has been edited for clarity.

What was the first social network you joined?

I joined Instagram when I was 12.

How did you experience being on social media?

I was spending at least six hours a day on these apps, scrolling mindlessly, absorbing all these unrealistic body standards. This led to eating disorders. It just became this awful loop of going to these apps, especially Instagram, feeling worse about myself, but feeling like I couldn’t stop scrolling because it has this weird power over me . Social media served as a tool to amplify negative attributes and feelings that I really didn’t want to have.

Many recent news stories have highlighted the negative effects that social media can have on young people and on self-esteem. How did these stories influence your thinking about the project?

The first article I read that really got me started was How smartphones destroyed a generation. I found study after study showing the possible correlation between increased rates of anxiety, suicide rates, and tracking eating disorders alongside increased rates of use.

What other factors drove your decision to start the disconnect movement?

The most powerful thing for me was not the studies. It was the fact that the personal stories weren’t being told and there was no epicenter where people could come together and say, “This is my personal experience. “This is how I got hurt.” “These are the accounts that made me feel bad about myself.” I knew it was necessary. The genie came out of the bottle.

As Gen Zers, we understand that there are positive attributes and negative attributes to social media, but right now, in their current use, they can be really harmful.

How does the Log Off Movement solve these problems?

Through our podcast, leadership advice, educational program on how to use online spaces safely, and blogging, we discuss ways to advance technology and allow it to return to being a tool rather than a a controller.

What we’re asking teens to do is be comfortable talking about their experiences so we can educate lawmakers to understand a Gen Z perspective, what we need from technology, our privacy issues, our having mental health issues. We have an advocacy initiative through Technology[nically] Policyadvocating for laws to ensure teens have a safe online experience, in particular the California Age-Appropriate Design Code Bill.

Your website indicates that you intend to promote healthy ways to exist on social media, rather than asking people to disconnect completely. What does healthy social media engagement look like?

I know that for me, I can’t disconnect completely. Healthy use of social media would be any interaction where the user feels they benefit and their health is not compromised. It’s mentally disconnecting for a second and thinking about what makes you happiest and why you’re on social media. If you’re not enjoying it at all, then I’d say the healthiest type of social media existence and the healthiest habit is to log off.

Having a digital presence may seem inevitable these days. Still, it doesn’t have to be exhausting. How have you adapted your own relationship to social networks? What methods worked?

Whenever I go through a stressful time with exams, I delete Instagram. I know that in times of stress, I’m going to tend to mindlessly use it as a form of coping. Another thing that worked for me is Grayscale, which makes the phone appear only black and white.

I always suggest screen genius, which offers solutions to limit screen time. I use Habit Lab for Chrome, which helps you reduce your time online. This creates a level of friction between you and the addictive technology.

Are there any apps that you particularly like?

BeReal is my favorite. At some point during the day, you will receive a notification simply saying: “It’s time to be real”. And you take a picture of everything you do. It feels like a real time of someone’s day.

What feedback do you get from other teenagers?

One spent six hours a day on social media and said her eyes hurt. Coming down, she says, she can now see better. It’s like the world is much clearer, both mentally and physically, for her.

What changes have you seen in your own mental health as a result of limiting your social media consumption?

I’m still dealing with my generalized anxiety disorder, my OCD. But I can tell you significantly that the symptoms, especially around my body image, have really diminished.

What is your ultimate goal with this effort?

I really hope this will result in some sort of pivot that prioritizes the well-being of users in these online environments. Technology is embedded in the DNA of our generation. He works to push toward regulation, so that more systematic change can occur where individuals can feel more protected and find healthier habits.

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CSS Indigenous Studies Outreach Initiative https://knz-clan.com/css-indigenous-studies-outreach-initiative/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 05:17:37 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/css-indigenous-studies-outreach-initiative/ Mrs Irene Wardle with the Year 12 Native Studies class, taken at the Major Project exhibit, Cammeraygal High School The program incorporated appropriate ethical research methodologies that reduced the demand on Indigenous communities from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The virtual delivery allowed several students to share their questions about the major project to […]]]>

Mrs Irene Wardle with the Year 12 Native Studies class, taken at the Major Project exhibit, Cammeraygal High School

The program incorporated appropriate ethical research methodologies that reduced the demand on Indigenous communities from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The virtual delivery allowed several students to share their questions about the major project to deepen cultural understanding and for teachers to gain insightful cultural teaching tools for future lesson planning. Cammeraygal Secondary School in Crows Nest, Green Point Christian College on the Central Coast and Sarah Redfern Secondary School in Minto participated in the program alongside their teachers.

The program produced the results of the CSS; including analysis of HSC exam questions; developing student major project ideas, ethical research methodologies and appropriate community consultation techniques and a live question-and-answer session with Indigenous knowledge holders. Students were able to document their ideas and meaningful cultural conversations in their journals, in preparation for the HSC major project criteria. The values ​​of the program were to culturally engage Indigenous Elders through a safe and appropriate consultation process during the challenges of COVID-19. Each student was able to ask Indigenous Elders and Indigenous educators direct questions about their projects. Topics included health, housing, criminal justice, agriculture, native languages, native clothing, arts, native dance and music.

HSC Native Studies offers high school students the opportunity to develop ethical and analytical research skills through their major project and content focuses on Indigenous peoples’ relationship with land, heritage and identity. Over the course of two years of classes, a historical inquiry into colonialism, racism, and prejudice, from pre-contact to recent events, is examined. The program allows students to connect their learning experiences and ideas for major projects through the cultural safety of Indigenous knowledge holders. The program is a celebration of the spirit of reconciliation processes.

The feedback received from Grade 12 students and teachers has been overwhelmingly positive. It demonstrated the positive impact of a tailor-made outreach activity, made possible through strong collaboration between colleagues at the University of Sydney and valued members of the Indigenous community.

The HSC Indigenous Studies Major Projects Consultancy Program is expected to return early in the fourth quarter of 2022, focusing on supporting schools in remote/rural areas and new teachers assigned to teach this course of the HSC. The Expression of Interest is open to teachers who may be assigned to the Grade 12 Native Studies course in 2023. Please Sign up for our expression of interest form.

Banne Image: The Three Sisters, photo taken by Catherine Rendell

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An intention to serve – The Hindu BusinessLine https://knz-clan.com/an-intention-to-serve-the-hindu-businessline/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 12:41:37 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/an-intention-to-serve-the-hindu-businessline/ A civil servant’s career generally follows a predictable trajectory. Tejendra Khanna had an extraordinary one. In his memoir, “An Intent To Serve,” he paints a fascinating picture of a stellar career, spanning over four decades. The narrative, interspersed with interesting vignettes, gives a chronological account of his life of service which began in Punjab and […]]]>

A civil servant’s career generally follows a predictable trajectory. Tejendra Khanna had an extraordinary one. In his memoir, “An Intent To Serve,” he paints a fascinating picture of a stellar career, spanning over four decades. The narrative, interspersed with interesting vignettes, gives a chronological account of his life of service which began in Punjab and culminated with his tenure as Lieutenant Governor of Delhi. For the uninitiated reader, it offers insight into the unique career profile of someone who straddled the agrarian economy, the world of international trade negotiations and diplomacy. The book also gives a brief overview of Khanna’s philosophical worldview: a “Sufi view of life” and the need to “fulfil one’s duties to others due to the concept of dharma”.

A deep commitment to fairness, a sense of humility in public relations, and impartiality in decision-making are recurring themes throughout the book. Most civil servants end up dribbling the ball, bringing about incremental changes in their area of ​​work. Khanna comes across as a bold decision-maker, true to his convictions, backed by a strong scientific temperament. At the start of the green revolution in Punjab, he pioneered the tractor movement in the state, going against the wisdom of the central ministries and the instinct of his own minister. Punjab Tractors Limited was born which later played a crucial role in transforming rural Punjab. His management style has a distinct corporate flavor, evident through some of his key decisions during his tenures as Secretary of the Trade and Food Ministries. As Chief Secretary, he led the Punjab bureaucracy through a tumultuous phase, with terrorism at its peak.

His memoirs are a reflection on his own professional ethics and core values. At the same time, it is the mirror of the current malaise that besets the public service. Punjab’s political ecosystem, at the start of his career, had no ministers “firing the shot from the shoulders of the civil servant”. This contrasts sharply with current realities, where the political executive feels “unhappy with public servants whose advice contradicts their own views.”

He is distressed by the “symbiotic relationship” between politicians who receive unethical support and compliance from a section of public servants. A violation of the “code of ethics” allows officials to “use the instruments of power and authority for personal gain”. It recalls the saying of “engaged” bureaucracy, which rose to prominence under the leadership of Indira Gandhi. The question posed to the reader is…commitment to what?

This lowering of probity standards would resonate with many people. He advocates a radical solution. In addition to the usual performance appraisal, he suggests an “exit survey” of people who interact with officials on three crucial criteria: honesty, courtesy and the judicious exercise of authority. Clearly, these are attributes of which he holds essential traits in officers “intent to serve.” Khanna also disapproves of the tendency towards excessive centralization, which he says is rooted in the feudal history of the society. The “feudal lord” must then be obeyed in all circumstances, rightly or wrongly.

His stint as Lieutenant Governor of Delhi is an illustration of his beliefs. He launched the “LG Listening Post” as a means for citizens to voice their grievances and set up a mechanism to track their redress. In a novel experience, it deployed former defense officers in areas of municipal management. The underlying premise was that as a mission-driven force, they would be able to perform much better than civilian officers in creating clean, livable urban spaces. His tenure also sparked a good deal of controversy at the Commonwealth Games. He goes to great lengths to explain the role of the Delhi Development Authority, which he heads, in making pragmatic decisions for the timely execution of Games Village-related projects. He also questions the role of the media in the saga of the Games. “Instead of raising national morale,” he laments, the media “shoot us in the foot.” A few interesting anecdotes reveal his relationship with Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit, who appears to have remained largely cordial, despite insignificant differences.

For today’s generation of public servants, the book is a benchmark for leadership and courage. It is an exhortation for senior officers to “create an environment of collegiate-style free expression and exchange of views”. The democratic decision-making style was strongly advocated, although it could lead to delays. His reflections on the current public service environment present a rather bleak picture. Most of his observations on the challenges facing the service are on point. Yet, instead of making it seem like all is lost, perhaps it could have ended on a happier note with some sound advice for young people.

(The reviewer is a civil servant, currently serving with the Delhi government. Opinions are personal.)

About the book

Title: An intention to serve

Author: Tejendra Khanna

Editor: Harper Collins India

Price: ₹558 (218 pages)

Discover the book on Amazon

Published on

June 12, 2022

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Elon Musk has become the villain liberals always imagined him to be https://knz-clan.com/elon-musk-has-become-the-villain-liberals-always-imagined-him-to-be/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/elon-musk-has-become-the-villain-liberals-always-imagined-him-to-be/ Things have changed. In a way that was almost naively touching in that it was personal – and transactional -, Musk tweeted a few weeks ago that “given the unprovoked attacks on me by leading Democrats and a very cold shoulder to Tesla and SpaceX, I intend to vote Republican in November.” His politics donations […]]]>

Things have changed. In a way that was almost naively touching in that it was personal – and transactional -, Musk tweeted a few weeks ago that “given the unprovoked attacks on me by leading Democrats and a very cold shoulder to Tesla and SpaceX, I intend to vote Republican in November.” His politics donations in recent years evolved from predominantly blue, to mixed, to almost entirely Republican. He has promised that if his bid to buy Twitter is successful, he would bring former President Donald Trump back to the platform, a decision he says he made on non-ideological “free speech” grounds but which has an obvious partisan valence.

Many liberals’ incandescent hatred of Musk has always been a bit silly, given that he might be the single most important driver of commercial renewable energy technology in the world. Now that makes more sense. “Wealthy zillionaire entrepreneur goes Republican” is not shocking news. But Musk is sui generis; his publicly expressed views on specific issues have been all over the map. Looking more closely at his conversion can tell us as much about how our politics and culture have changed over the past decade as about his own often confusing mind.

To begin to understand this change, we have to talk about freedom of expression. Or rather, “free speech” as it is commonly understood today, that is, social media moderation.

In a bit poorly worded tweet, Musk recently described Democrats as “the kindness party” that has now become “the party of division and hate.” Whatever he means by that, there’s one thing the Democratic Party has made clear has to become: The party of modules. As social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook have become the de facto public square over the past decade, liberals have been outspoken about the need for these platforms to remove extremist and misleading content, inspiring a lucrative new industry aimed at to fight “misinformation” on the Internet.

Of which there is, of course, plenty, and just as much evidence that conservatives are more likely to cook it up and share it – hence the liberal appetite for moderation. (In fairness, liberals haven’t exactly covered themselves in glory by policing this news landscape, including pushing for the censorship of legitimate stories about incriminating content from Hunter Biden’s laptop.) The Key to understand Musk’s “free speech” crusade is to understand that for large numbers of Americans, the substance or actual direction of this censorship is mostly irrelevant (except, of course, when it happens to overlap with your new ideological beliefs).

There are a myriad of reasons why “free speech” has become a political value encoded by the right, including progressive shifts in social norms around personal identity. But more important here is the core principle of non-interference – what former Twitter VP Tony Wang meant when he once called Twitter “the freedom wing of expression of freedom of speech day.” For native Silicon Valley quasi-libertarians like Musk, moderation is an emergency glass-breaking tactic if it is to be used.

From this point of view, the Internet is an oasis of humanity in its vast uncontrollable expanse, allowing unlimited freedom of expression. contra the institutions that govern our real lives. It was once a techno-utopian, vaguely liberal idea; now it is one that squarely appeals to, and largely benefits, due to the effects of social media algorithmsthe right. (Although for hardcore activists, of course, this commitment to free speech can always be conveniently abandoned in the service of fight the culture war.)

Another major shift that clarifies Musk’s about-face is the Republican Party’s shift in attitude toward business. At least for now, Mitt Romney’s presidential bid has been the farm’s last gasp laissez-faire, invariably pro-business GOP. Trump’s willingness to reward his friends and punish his political enemies in the corporate world, as in the highly publicized case of a Carrier plant in Indiana from the start of his presidency, was one of his major contributions to the new Republican Party, inspiring would-be heirs like Florida Governor Ron DeSantis in his crusade against anti-American purveyors of degeneracy like… Disney World, or a Major League Baseball team.

In one light, one could view this use of government power to censor corporations for their political stances as a matter of free speech, much like the aforementioned book ban. But given Musk’s new political affiliation, it’s incredibly easy to imagine him forgiving a figure like, say, Texas Governor Greg Abbott after he theoretically expanded local exclusions for SpaceX in Texas as a tribute. to the billionaire’s accomplishments in owning the libs.

It has always been a bit insane for liberals to oppose Musk so fervently given his environmentalist in good faithincluding, recall, bashing Trump himself over his nomination of Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson as Secretary of State; Musk and those to his left have a theoretical common enemy in the party resolutely hostile clean energy Republican Party. But the simultaneous transformation of the Democrats into a pro-moderation party and the Republicans into an old-school party, Huey Long Style Patronage means that it is paradoxically almost impossible for Musk to find common cause with the former. Both are at the heart of media phenomena and linked to the culture war, divorced from the real environment. the impact of Musk’s work even further from his place in American society.

Another bit of bad timing for Musk’s split from the Democratic Party tracks with his evolution from an Edisonian technologist and occasional cultural gadfly into a more direct Fordist political force. Henry Ford was a notoriously hyperactive and reckless political actor, as well as a Nazi sympathizer. Musk, to be very clear, is no such thing, but the two men share the same rare and outsized status as prime movers on a global scale, as best represented in Musk’s case by his purchase yet provisional from Twitter.

All of this, if you’re a liberal, you might look and say, So what? To paraphrase a wise millennial elder icon, Musk has the plant, but we have the power. And furthermore, despite his overall environmentalism, Musk has done much to shred his viability as a liberal ally, from questionable labor practices at Tesla to him, shall we say, backward cultural views. In that light, having one less leading billionaire on the blue team is simply further evidence of the party’s identification with minorities and America’s beleaguered working class.

The problem ultimately has less to do with Musk himself than with his function as a cultural guide. To see his long and contradictory record of political declarations, one can venture to say that his ideological commitments are at the very least superficial. Which surely makes him largely attached to his legions of fans and followers – according to YouGov, Musk is the 25th most popular character in America; predictably, he enjoys 13 more favor points with men than with women.

In a country where politics is increasingly broken down into terms of upbringing and cultural attitudes rather than traditional indicators such as class or family ties, Musk is the high-profile avatar of the exact type of ideologically agnostic, anti-PC, nominally Rogan-loving average American. who, at some point, would have been reluctant to identify too strongly with either party. (For many of them, the “dumb guy things” described at the top of this essay aren’t dumb guy stuff at all, but iconoclastic antics.) There is a plot of these votersand while they may in their hearts identify more with one major party or the other, they have unpredictable and intersecting viewpoints on hot political topics like abortion, the legalization of marijuana or the immigration.

Democrats shouldn’t and don’t have to crawl for Elon Musk’s goodwill or political affiliation. But it is worth wondering why, in a political age where the importance of speech and cultural issues have been massively elevated, they have lost such a powerful and influential figure who would otherwise be aligned with their political goals – and who shares a somewhat inscrutable outlook, but seemingly compelling outlook with the kind of Americans they lose ground with.

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GUESS teams up again with J Balvin for the Amor collection https://knz-clan.com/guess-teams-up-again-with-j-balvin-for-the-amor-collection/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 05:01:17 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/guess-teams-up-again-with-j-balvin-for-the-amor-collection/ The 47-piece collection includes pieces for men and women as well as selected models for children. Prices range from $14 for socks to $148 for a varsity jacket. It features bright, pastel colors with graphics including hearts, swirling stripes and clovers that set the playful vibe of the collection. GUESS Originals, a collection from the […]]]>

The 47-piece collection includes pieces for men and women as well as selected models for children. Prices range from $14 for socks to $148 for a varsity jacket. It features bright, pastel colors with graphics including hearts, swirling stripes and clovers that set the playful vibe of the collection.

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GUESS Originals, a collection from the To guess brand, has released a new collaborative collection with musician J Balvin inspired by his documentary “The Boy from Medellín”. The GUESS Originals x J Balvin Amor Collection builds on the GUESS DNA of elevated graphics and fabrics while focusing on J Balvin the person and their mental health journey.

Balvin and GUESS first met in 2017 and began discussing the possibilities of a collaboration soon after. The iconic California company and the musician share similar interests in fashion, art and more and, after developing a personal relationship, decided to collaborate after realizing how compatible Balvin’s global voice is with the global brand presence. The collection presents messages of “amor y paz” (love and peace) and is intended to be a renewal of happiness and positivity and above all pushes for self-love.

“With José’s voice and our platform, we thought it could be very meaningful to spread positive messages. He’s always been positive since we’ve been working together. color, but this time we wanted to make a more literal statement. The more awareness, the better,” said Nicolai Marciano, Director of Brand Partnerships and Marketing and Chief Creative Officer of Guess Originals.

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Balvin has long been a mental health and wellness advocate after speaking out about his struggles with anxiety and depression. In addition to helping de-stigmatize mental health in the Latinx community, Balvin is set to launch his own bilingual, interactive mental wellness app, OYE, in fall 2022.

“Throughout my own journey in the field of mental health and wellbeing, I have been inspired and committed to bringing resources to more people around the world. With OYE, we have created a community-driven platform that will provide engaging and accessible emotional wellness practices for everyone,” Balvin said. “Everyone’s health journey is different and deeply personal. We wanted to not only encourage and empower people to prioritize emotional and mental health, but also provide various opportunities for the global community to creatively build their own worlds of wellness.

The 47-piece collection launched on May 12 and includes pieces for men and women as well as selected styles for kids. Prices range from $14 for socks to $148 for a varsity jacket. It features bright, pastel colors with graphics including hearts, swirling stripes and clovers that set the playful vibe of the collection.

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The men’s portion of the collection features a new take on the classic GUESS cargo pant with a relaxed fit and raised twill fabric. The main rooms have been enhanced with vibrant graphics to fit the overall theme of the capsule. The women’s portion of the collection includes a variety of graphic shirts, swimsuits, tops and matching sets. Brightly colored accessories, crochet tops and dresses lean on the summery theme featured throughout the collection.

“The Amor collection is a very personal expression of José’s style. It’s much more focused and refined than previous collections that we’ve done just based on how the relationship has evolved. Really fun and vibrant colors, positive messages, comfortable fabrics and fits,” said Marciano.

Campaign video director Colin Tilley said, “Collaborating with GUESS was a dream, collaborating with José is always something special, and combining the two for this epic campaign is one for the books! We wanted to celebrate togetherness.

GUESS and J Balvin previously teamed up for a collection inspired by his 2018 album “Vibras.” Merchandise was made available at J Balvin’s concerts and at GUESS stores near performance venues before being released widely in early 2019. The Vibras collection marked the brand’s first-ever celebrity campaign to feature a Latino male as the face of the campaign. The collection was followed by the Colores collection, inspired by Balvin’s “Colores” album, which for the first time also included pieces for men and women as well as for children.

Photos courtesy of GUESS.

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