Personal Expression – KNZ Clan http://knz-clan.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:17:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://knz-clan.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Personal Expression – KNZ Clan http://knz-clan.com/ 32 32 Chicory: a colorful tale (REVIEW) https://knz-clan.com/chicory-a-colorful-tale-review/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 13:00:44 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/chicory-a-colorful-tale-review/ Developped by: Greg LobanovPublished by: FinjiRelease: December 15, 2021 (Nintendo Switch) Chicory: a colorful tale is a beautiful and emotional game. Chicory was originally developed and released in June 2021 for PC and Playstation. The game was released on Nintendo Switch in mid-December. The moving story and charming world feel right at home in the […]]]>

Developped by: Greg Lobanov
Published by: Finji
Release: December 15, 2021 (Nintendo Switch)

Chicory: a colorful tale is a beautiful and emotional game. Chicory was originally developed and released in June 2021 for PC and Playstation. The game was released on Nintendo Switch in mid-December. The moving story and charming world feel right at home in the intimate setting of portable play on the Switch. While Chicory is released in 2021, it will remain poignant for anyone struggling with mental health issues or who finds their place in the world. Chicory’s tale goes deeper than the aesthetic in her coloring book seems. Therefore, it is a moving and engaging experience.

Chicory’s game director Greg Lobanov has already released Wandersong. Character designer and animator, Alexis Dean-Jones. Lena Raine, the composer of Celeste, is behind the excellent Chicorée soundtrack. The combined creative team and character designs give Chicory a timeless feel. Their work not only creates one of the best games of 2021, but a game that will remain relevant and moving for future players.

Story

The player is Chicory’s janitor, the current bearer of magic brushes in a long line of brush holders. When Chicory disappears, it’s up to the main character to find them. At the start of the story, the main character (each player can name the character) discovers a darkness seeping into the world and removing the color provided by the brush bearer. This obscurity is something all brush bearers have struggled against and comes to represent both a physical and an emotional threat. Mental health issues are treated tactfully in Chicory and become part of the central story. The main character struggles with self-confidence and impostor syndrome. While Chicory struggles with depression. As the game progresses more layers are added to the two characters and the complexity reflects our social and cultural issues of mental health and well-being.

Gameplay

Chicory is played in a top-down view similar to traditional The Legend of Zelda games. Each screen connects to the next to map a congruent map. The only fight takes place during boss fights, and these have unlimited tries and assists as needed. The developers even include the ability to skip boss fights for photosensitive players. Environmental puzzles abound and are the main element of gameplay. Through the use of the magic brush, players paint the environment to grow, shrink and activate the landscape. Much like a real adventure game, there are many environmental areas that a player can see that require additional abilities to access them. Fortunately, these abilities unlock as the game progresses. The brush illuminates the caves. Painting the landscape ultimately allows that player to move around in the painting or on the cliffs. These sets of movements open up new areas to explore.

In addition to environmental puzzles, the main character interacts with a variety of the world’s population. The side quests offer unique dialogue and explore more of the personalities of the main character and those they meet. On top of all the exploration and interaction, the world is an empty canvas for the player. Painting the world can be a calming change of pace. Or paint can create notes and cues for the player. I frequently selected specific color palettes for areas that I couldn’t access. Then, looking at the map, I had clear markers for where to return and explore as new abilities opened up.

The game includes a built-in hint system where the character calls home for advice on the next step. Even by encouraging the character to watch online if they are blocked. All of these systems lower the barrier of entry and reduce friction for players of all experience levels.

Graphic

A living coloring book is in praise of Chicory’s graphics. The game exists in black and white and allows the player to color the world as they wish. Fortunately, this approach reflects the value of the self-expression that the story explores. Painting requires an investment of time. However, the game provides this creative space for players to engage with however they want. Coloring is required for some puzzles and side quests, but just as art is subjective, so too is in-game graphics. I created lush colorful spaces. And I created horrors that clash.

Ring

The soundtrack and Lena Raine score is something I have listened to outside of the game. It’s beautiful and uplifting at times. Bewitching and emotional towards others. It captures both the joyful and optimistic moments of exploration and the self-doubt experienced by the characters.

Concerns

As a reviewer I often push through a game to finish the review and get the opinions back to the audience. Chicory encouraged me to take my time and express myself in the world. Therefore, one of the outcomes is this delayed review. But another result is a deep appreciation for the world and the characters created by the developers. Plus, it took an emotional journey not just for the main character but for myself as a player. Many of the emotional questions raised throughout the game will be identifiable by players. Chicory gives players of all experience levels the space and encouragement to keep going and believe in themselves.

Chicory a tale for today

Ultimately, Chicory: A Colorful Tale is an affirmative narrative journey of personal growth and discovery. Messages of self-esteem and self-confidence are invaluable to any player. Chicory’s clever approach to graphics and great soundtrack fosters a creative environment for players to explore and express themselves. Players who take the time to invest in the world will find value in adventure and art. Chicory is a timeless classic that deserves to be experienced.

Rating: 9.2

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Indigenous Lenca chief shot dead in Honduras https://knz-clan.com/indigenous-lenca-chief-shot-dead-in-honduras/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 14:41:13 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/indigenous-lenca-chief-shot-dead-in-honduras/ TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras – A local leader of the indigenous Lenca group in Honduras was shot dead on Sunday, police said. Pablo Isabel Hernández was killed on a dirt road near the town of San Marcos de Caiquín as he made his way to a local church with his father and brothers, police spokesman Cristian Manuel […]]]>

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras – A local leader of the indigenous Lenca group in Honduras was shot dead on Sunday, police said.

Pablo Isabel Hernández was killed on a dirt road near the town of San Marcos de Caiquín as he made his way to a local church with his father and brothers, police spokesman Cristian Manuel Nolasco said.

Nolasco said the ambush could be linked to personal or political disputes.

Hernández was the director of a radio station known as “Radio Tenan, the indigenous voice of the Lencas”. He has also been active in Indigenous education and environmental projects.

The Honduran Community Media Association said in a statement that it “viewed the murder as another attack on freedom of expression and the defense of human rights.”

Hernández was the second Lenca leader killed in less than a year. In March 2020, activist Lenca Juan Carlos Cerros Escalante was shot dead in the town of Nueva Granada, in the province of Cortés on the Caribbean coast. He had helped lead a fight against the construction of a dam.

Hernández and Cerros Escalante were from the same indigenous community as Berta Cáceres, an award-winning environmental and indigenous rights defender who was murdered in 2016.

According to rights groups, more than three dozen environmental activists have been killed in Honduras since Cáceres’ death.

Cáceres was co-founder of the National Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras. She helped organize opposition to the Agua Zarca dam project, which was to be built on the Galcarque River. The river has spiritual significance for the Lenca people in addition to being an essential water source. The dam project remains frozen.

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The healing power of “thank you” https://knz-clan.com/the-healing-power-of-thank-you/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 15:02:20 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/the-healing-power-of-thank-you/ Recently, I saw a patient die unexpectedly in the operating room. I consider myself mentally difficult, but it was the first time I had experienced such a situation, and the impact on me was much greater than I expected. The fact that the patient had passed away was terrible, but after our futile and desperate […]]]>

Recently, I saw a patient die unexpectedly in the operating room. I consider myself mentally difficult, but it was the first time I had experienced such a situation, and the impact on me was much greater than I expected.

The fact that the patient had passed away was terrible, but after our futile and desperate attempts to save him failed, I still had to face the horror of telling his wife. I took a chaplain and one of my residents with me and met the man’s wife in a private patient conference room. There was no way to approach her gently. “I’m so sorry to tell you this,” I blurted out, “your husband died during the operation. Hearing these words, she started to scream and sob uncontrollably.

That night I couldn’t sleep. In my mind, I kept replaying the details of everything that had happened, and every time I closed my eyes all I could see was the look on the woman’s face as I uttered those horrible words.

The next morning, I canceled my clinic. I ended up taking several days off. When I returned to work, I felt like a dark cloud was hanging over me. My patient’s death had been an abnormal event. I was not careless or neglectful, but I was nonetheless overwhelmed by a complicated mixture of guilt, grief, questioning of my abilities and embarrassment. News of a patient dying in the operating room spreads quickly and unexpectedly.

Back at work, I struggled to face my colleagues and coworkers. In the operating room, I frequently work with a favorite scrub technician who was there when it happened. The first time we saw each other we both looked away and parted ways. It was still too cool.

My patient had been morbidly obese and plagued with a long list of health problems. His operation had been palliative for an incurable cancer. I tried to allay my grief and guilt by focusing on these details. I also called his wife and mother to apologize and checked with everyone who had been in the operation to make sure they were okay. Without a doubt, it all helped, but the black cloud hanging over me refused to dissipate.

I love my job as a cancer surgeon. However, it shook me deeply. I wondered if I could even continue. But then, slowly, rays of light began to pierce the dark place where I had been. Most were from grateful patients. I frequently share my personal phone number, and a little over a week after my patient passed away, I received the following text from a family member of another patient, along with a series of wedding photos:

“I just wanted to take a moment to thank you once again for saving my father’s life … because of you he was there! He went with her. [one of the sisters got married] down the aisle, had dad and daughter dance and had an amazing time with family and friends. This all happened because of you, and I just want to thank you once again from all of us! You gave us this time with my father and we will be eternally grateful to you! “

I knew the man in the tuxedo well in these photos. He had T4 laryngeal cancer, which, with black humor, had been called T7 during tumor counseling due to its extreme size. I had doubted that it would be possible to cure him, but we did.

Following this text message, it seemed that the patients began to express their gratitude one after the other. They didn’t know how much I needed it.

“You are my hero, Doc,” said a man who had survived a severe melanoma.

“I can’t thank you enough,” said another patient, who I had treated for recurrent tongue cancer, as he squeezed my hand over and over while looking me seriously in the eye.

But it wasn’t just the patients who were helping me. I also received a handwritten letter from a recently graduated Favorite Resident: “I can’t say enough about how much I enjoyed working with you,” he wrote. “You have been incredibly and profoundly influential on me as a physician and as a person.”

Maybe more patients and colleagues than normal suddenly started to express their gratitude, but I doubt it. The truth, I guess, is that I listened better because I suddenly needed to hear these things.

The emotions I felt because of the dying patient never completely disappeared, but in the weeks and months that followed, I managed to deal with this event. Looking back, I think the gratitude that was shared with me was a big factor in my recovery.

It made me think. Often in life, we fail to be grateful or properly express our gratitude to others. Another mistake, however, is not “hearing” or fully appreciating the gratitude that is expressed to us.

As physicians, despite our best efforts, terrible things can still happen to the people for whom we are responsible. Fortunately, however, these events are rare, or at least rare enough to be more than outweighed by the good we are capable of accomplishing.

Finally, the drama of my patient’s death made me more sensitive to gratitude. Being more sensitive to gratitude has helped me better celebrate the many lives that I have the privilege of caring for.

Thorsen Haugen, MD, is an otolaryngologist.

This message appeared on Kevin®.


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Five of Denver’s most mysterious works of public art https://knz-clan.com/five-of-denvers-most-mysterious-works-of-public-art/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 12:58:00 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/five-of-denvers-most-mysterious-works-of-public-art/ Denver is teeming with public art, from murals of local legends to sculptures by internationally renowned artists. Some works have become so famous that they are almost synonymous with the city, at least for art lovers, like “The Yearling” or the big blue bear entitled “I see what you mean. “Others are just confusing to […]]]>

Denver is teeming with public art, from murals of local legends to sculptures by internationally renowned artists. Some works have become so famous that they are almost synonymous with the city, at least for art lovers, like “The Yearling” or the big blue bear entitled “I see what you mean. “Others are just confusing to see, and a few – notably ‘Blue Mustang’ – have confusing stories behind them.

Here are five of Denver’s most mysterious works of public art:

The escalator of laughter “
Colorado Convention Center
Jim Green’s “Laughing Escalator” was installed at the Colorado Convention Center in 2004, and has been annoying unconscious cyclists ever since. Using a four-channel sound installation, the escalator descending into the pre-function area of ​​the ballroom plays recorded laughter through the cracks between its steps. According to Denver Public Art, “a variety of clear, healthy voices will be used” for the “outdoor sound mixing. [that creates] a model of constantly evolving rhythms built from laughter. These days, with COVID reducing crowds, the sounds can seem particularly ghostly; you may prefer to take the stairs.

“Round”
Denver Museum of Nature and Science

Click to enlarge

“Round”

Denver Public Art

This seven-foot-tall bronze sphere appears to be waiting for such a large beetle to push it, and as you approach “Rondure” outside the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, you’ll find that it does too. noise. The motion-activated sound features cries of wild animals found in Colorado, which artist Nikki Pike has collaborated with BARTer collective. To the work itself, Pike applied a texture reminiscent of the bark of a tree, giving the sphere a natural effect that complements the sounds of nature.

Blucifer “
Denver Intl Airport
The slightly terrifying 32-foot-tall blue horse outside Denver International Airport was given the nickname “Blucifer” not only for its glowing neon eyes, but for its history of creation: the making of this sculpture has killed Luis Jiménez. The part was ordered for the airport then still closed in 1993; the New Mexico artist was far from the deadline and was being sued by the city while working in his studio in 2006. That’s when part of the current horse fell on him and killed him; his sons completed the project. The sculpture was inspired by an old Colorado legend about a blue mustang stallion leading other horses to water and even to steal; the flaming eyes were added as a tribute to Jiménez’s father, who owned a neon sign store. It’s certainly an unforgettable sight for those entering or leaving the city (although we wish people would stop thinking that it symbolizes the Broncos).

Click to enlarge "National Velvet" - PUBLIC ART OF DENVER

“Velvet National”

Denver Public Art

National Velvet “
Rue de la Platte

John McEnroe’s sculpture near the 16th Street Pedestrian Bridge has sparked controversy since it was installed in 2008. The twenty-foot-tall obelisk is made up of what looks like melting jelly beans gathered into an almost shape. similar to a Christmas tree which is highlighted by interior lighting. The sculpture won the People’s Choice Award for Best Public Art the year it was installed, but not everyone is happy with it, with a Westword wag labeling it “Saggy Boob, Electric Penis.”

“Sky song

Levitt Hall
Works like “Sky Song” only come to life through interaction with their viewers – and sometimes aren’t even recognized as works of art. The installation at the Levitt Pavilion by Denver artists Nick Geurts and Ryan Elmendorf doesn’t appear like a traditional sculpture, but its 33 buttons invite passers-by to interact with it and understand exactly what it is and does. The eight-foot-high polished steel structure and its surroundings are button activated, which activate the sounds of bells and wind chimes when the surroundings are calm, or cast lights on the facade of the amphitheater when in. a concert. It’s easy to miss, but strangely haunting.


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22 advertising industry resolutions for 2022 https://knz-clan.com/22-advertising-industry-resolutions-for-2022/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:18:56 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/22-advertising-industry-resolutions-for-2022/ Suzanne Powers, President, McCann Worldgroup and Director of Global Strategy “First of all, well-being is everything. It’s a general feeling, of course, for our people and the way we also set the conditions for them to thrive, but also for our customers and our own business. The well-being of individuals, families, communities, businesses and the […]]]>

Suzanne Powers, President, McCann Worldgroup and Director of Global Strategy

“First of all, well-being is everything. It’s a general feeling, of course, for our people and the way we also set the conditions for them to thrive, but also for our customers and our own business. The well-being of individuals, families, communities, businesses and the world in general are completely interdependent on each other. Our own proprietary Truth Central data backs this up and found that brands, rather than government, have more power to effect positive change. The power is in our hands as brand custodians and creators. Yet we cannot do any of these if your talent is not in mental, physical, functional, and emotional states where they and creativity can flourish. It’s up to us, as an industry, to tackle this challenge together and I decide to spend the energy on just that. Second, human ingenuity stimulates renewal. We have learned so much over the course of the pandemic, from denial, to fear, to acceptance, and even to innovation, the power of humans not only to “overcome” but, in fact, to flourish, to invent, to create. , has been nothing short of inspiring. In our own business, we’ve invented so many ways to solve problems together across seemingly disparate geographies, capacities and agencies, as conditions change in the blink of an eye. Why? Because, as our research reveals, there is a strong desire globally for people to create real change from what they have learned and what they continue to experience every day as the he uncertainty persists. “


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Archibald, Beatles and Desert Art: Summer Delights in Australian Regional Galleries | Culture https://knz-clan.com/archibald-beatles-and-desert-art-summer-delights-in-australian-regional-galleries-culture/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/archibald-beatles-and-desert-art-summer-delights-in-australian-regional-galleries-culture/ Fancy a road trip to celebrate the end of a very trying year? Hop on your bike, charge the electric vehicle, shift gears on gas to visit one of Australia’s regional art galleries. And don’t forget to check the entry rules secured against Covid in advance. Geelong Gallery: Archie 100: a century of the Archibald […]]]>

Fancy a road trip to celebrate the end of a very trying year?

Hop on your bike, charge the electric vehicle, shift gears on gas to visit one of Australia’s regional art galleries. And don’t forget to check the entry rules secured against Covid in advance.

Geelong Gallery: Archie 100: a century of the Archibald Prize

Until February 20, 2022

The best paintings available in 100 years of the Archibald Prize have been brought together in an exhibition, called the Archie 100, and it’s a treat.

Most of the time, the Archibald’s annual portrait exhibition features a handful of notable works and plenty of medium to medium (and that’s nice) works, but for Archie 100 the selection process has chipped away a chunk of rock for reveal a Michelangelo’s David inside.

Okay, I’m exaggerating, but there’s no doubt that from the original 6,000 portraits curator Natalie Wilson gave us a superb selection, capturing not only the similarities, but most importantly the essence of the models.

Many of them aren’t winners (because judges are often wrong) but iconic images abound, including William Dargie’s Albert Namatjira, Natasha Bieniek’s Wendy Whiteley, John Brack’s Barry Humphries as Dame Edna and a self-portrait with Chuck Berry, among others. people, by Vincent Namatjira, great-grandson of Albert.

The Portrait of Albert Namatjira by William Dargie, 1956, is presented at the Geelong Gallery as part of the traveling exhibition of the Art Gallery of NSW Archie 100, A Century of the Archibald Prize. Photograph: Estate of William Dargie

If you’ve watched Finding the Archibald, hosted by Rachel Griffiths on ABC TV earlier this year, you’ll know it all, but nothing beats seeing the real thing. There are also associated special events on offer, including night viewings on some Friday evenings and a curators’ conference. Archie 100 is a traveling exhibition of the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Geelong Gallery is its only Victorian venue.

Ballarat International Photography Biennale

Last call for road tripers and locals, from now until mid-January, (exact date varies by location).

This central Victorian-era town is like a living open-air museum: experience real-time one of the world’s most impressive colonial architecture, gradual decline and a resurrection of the last days.

It’s all there in the fascinating streetscapes – a lot of which you can experience as you move between dozens of venues with exhibitions as part of the Ballarat International Foto Biennale, now extended until January.

The main one is the Ballarat Art Gallery, a compelling reminder of the claims of the attempts of the notables of the Golden Age to transplant the European academy to the antipodes.

Firmly in charge, curators and the wealthy, who would have thought that the very edifice they built in their image would one day host three photo exhibitions, each featuring a view from below and from outside that was once unthinkable.

The working class and the provincial Beatles, so central to the changing of the guard that made the British Empire instantly go out of fashion in the 1960s, are at the center of Linda McCartney: Retrospective. Two hundred photographs taken between 1965 and 1997 document the height of pop culture and beyond.

Iconic faces and intimate family photos feature in a selection curated by former Beatle Paul McCartney and his daughters, Linda, Mary and Stella. Hurry, because it ends on January 9th.

The Beatles, Abbey Road, London, 1969
The Beatles, Abbey Road, London, 1969, are on display at the Art Gallery of Ballarat as part of the exhibition Linda McCartney: Retrospective. Photography: Linda McCartney

Also on display is the view from the pink parts of the globe that powers both Robert Fielding’s Miil-Miilpa (Sacred) and Anindita Banerjee’s Ondormohol.

Fielding, an indigenous artist of Afghan descent, has built an impressive body of work exploring, or rather celebrating, the energizing presence of Tjukurpa (the Dream) in the lives of his Yankunytjatjara elders and the landscape around his community of Mimili, deep in the APY lands of the far north of South Australia.

The elders are depicted in close-up black-and-white elegiac photos that capture deep-grained, vigorous faces with the inner light of traditional traditions. The landscapes are captured in an experimental process that incorporates the sun and the earth as elements of the image, crushed by statements of ownership and belonging.

Banerjee, from Kolkata, Bengal, India, was struck by the familiarly evocative Victorian-style architecture of the public spaces in her adopted town, Ballarat.

The personal connection to Bengal and Ballarat, two outposts of the empire, one in collapse, the other restored to its magnificence, raises questions about how we see ‘here’ and ‘ over there ”and our relationship to time and the world around us.

The three exhibitions offer a nuanced and lively counterpoint to the imperial narrative embodied in the imperial architecture – frankly, often oppressive – of the city, within which their photographs operate their transgressive magic.

Alice springs

Desert Mob 30: celebration of 30 years of Desert Mob exhibitions. Reopening from January 11 to June 1, 2022.

Since 1991, the annual Desert Mob Exhibition at the Government of the Northern Territory’s Araluen Arts Center in Alice Springs has been a showcase for community art centers in central Australia.

These tiny communities located in some of Australia’s most remote places have been the driving force behind the flourishing of desert Aboriginal art into one of the most dynamic contemporary art movements in the world.

Invention, risk-taking, sheer beauty, and an assertive self-confidence that is rarely found elsewhere – as the world (finally) acknowledges. And every year, the Araluen Arts Center acquires the best of them for its own collection of desert art. All the big names are included of course, but one of the biggest thrills of Desert Mob is discovering unknown artists displaying “a fully formed artistic expression based on deep cultural knowledge and sovereignty,” as Araluen Arts puts it. Center.

Until June 1, 2022, you can see the best of the best, a retrospective selection of 50 works from the Araluen’s Desert Mob collection. In my humble opinion, there is no more thrilling and exciting collection of recent desert art in the world – and it encompasses all forms of art, from sculpture, printmaking, and sculpture to painting, textiles and fibers.

Often raw and honest, he can be avant-garde adventurous and a lot of fun too.

If you’re looking to take art home with you during your stay at Alice, don’t miss selections from Raft artspace and Talapi – two long-established galleries that deal directly with community art centers owned and operated by of aboriginal people, so that you can be sure of the ethical provenance when purchasing.

Or come back to September 2022 and take a deep breath of the intoxicating scent of spring gum blossoms in the pure desert air as you make your way to the next annual Desert Mob exhibit. This is your chance to buy from dozens of stalls in the art center and also in the main exhibition.


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At least four anti-coup protesters shot dead in Sudan as security forces attack broadcasters https://knz-clan.com/at-least-four-anti-coup-protesters-shot-dead-in-sudan-as-security-forces-attack-broadcasters/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 20:21:51 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/at-least-four-anti-coup-protesters-shot-dead-in-sudan-as-security-forces-attack-broadcasters/ By Kareem Khadder and Céline Alkhaldi, CNN At least four people were shot dead by Sudanese security forces During anti-coup protests near the capital Khartoum on Thursday, the Sudanese Central Medical Committee (SCDC), allied with civilians, said. Authorities fired live ammunition and tear gas at crowds in Omdurman, about 25 kilometers (16 miles) northwest of […]]]>

By Kareem Khadder and Céline Alkhaldi, CNN

At least four people were shot dead by Sudanese security forces During anti-coup protests near the capital Khartoum on Thursday, the Sudanese Central Medical Committee (SCDC), allied with civilians, said.

Authorities fired live ammunition and tear gas at crowds in Omdurman, about 25 kilometers (16 miles) northwest of the capital, SCDC said in a statement. He added that a number of people were injured and admitted to hospital.

In videos shared by activist groups, crowds of protesters can be seen running through plumes of white tear gas smoke and dispersing from the sound of alleged gunfire.

Other videos show protesters chanting “for civil status”.

The SCDC called on “all medical and specialist personnel” to come to the aid of the seriously injured and called on “militias” called on to obstruct the flow of ambulances and to delay the ability of medical teams to reach the injured.

CNN has contacted authorities for comment.

Thursday’s protests mark the 11th day of mass protests against the military regime since the October 25 coup. At least 52 people have been killed by security forces since, SCDC reported.

The US Embassy in Khartoum reiterated its support for “the peaceful expression of democratic aspirations and the need to respect and protect individuals exercising freedom of expression,” in a tweet Wednesday evening.

“We call for extreme discretion in the use of force and urge the authorities to refrain from resorting to arbitrary detention,” he said.

Thursday’s protests took place as Sudanese security forces sought to ban some broadcasters from covering them, according to reports from several media outlets.

Authorities raided the offices of Saudi broadcaster al-Arabiya and its affiliate al-Hadath, confiscating equipment and assaulting staff in Khartoum on Thursday, al-Arabiya said in a series of tweets.

“Sudanese security forces are raiding al-Arabiya and al-Hadath offices and confiscating equipment,” al-Arabiya said.

“Injuries among al-Arabiya and al-Hadath personnel as a result of assaults by Sudanese security forces,” another al-Arabiya tweet said. “Sudanese security forces assault and beat al-Arabiya reporters Lina Yacoub and Nizar Biqdawi, and assault and beat photojournalists and producers.

Earlier today, a Qatar-based television station said its reporters had been barred from covering the protests.

On a live television broadcast Thursday, Asharq News correspondent Sally Othman apologized to viewers saying she could not continue the show because Sudanese authorities were preventing her from doing so.

“… Forgive me, I am not in a position to continue the reporting that the authorities earlier prevented me from continuing, forgive me,” Othman said on the air.

Hours later, Asharq News said staff were arrested by security forces, posting an image of Othman with the message.

The US Embassy in Khartoum condemned Thursday’s violence, adding that “We also deplore the Sudanese security services’ violent attacks on media and journalists, and urge the authorities to protect press freedom.”

The tension is growing

Internet services have been severely disrupted since the coup and phone coverage remains spotty. Although everyday life almost came to a halt when the coup struck, shops, roads and some banks have since reopened.

The coup follows months of growing tensions in the country, where military and civilian groups have shared power since Bashir’s removal from office. Since 2019, Sudan had been ruled by a fragile alliance between the two.

That all changed when the army effectively took control, dissolving the Sovereign Council and the power-sharing transitional government, and temporarily detaining Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok.

The country’s military leader, General Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, reinstated Hamdok last month as part of an agreement between military and civilian leaders.

Under the agreement between Hamdok and Al-Burhan, Hamdok again becomes the head of the transitional government, which was first established after the ouster of President Omar al-Bashir in 2019.

The Council of Ministers, which was dissolved on October 25, will be re-established and the civilian and military leaders will share power. The constitution will be amended to define the partnership between civilians and the military in the transitional government.

But the deal also includes an as yet unspecified restructuring, according to Mudawi Ibrahim, a prominent National Forces Initiative (NFI) official, which helped mediate the talks, and he has met resistance in Sudan.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.


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Freedom From Religion Foundation gives prayer warning to Orrville BOE https://knz-clan.com/freedom-from-religion-foundation-gives-prayer-warning-to-orrville-boe/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 03:02:25 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/freedom-from-religion-foundation-gives-prayer-warning-to-orrville-boe/ ORRVILLE – An organization known to promote the separation of church and state blames schools in the city for praying to school council meetings. the Freedom of Religion Foundation notified on BBoard of Education via a December 22 email that said the opening of monthly public meetings with Christian prayer “goes beyond a public school […]]]>

ORRVILLE – An organization known to promote the separation of church and state blames schools in the city for praying to school council meetings.

the Freedom of Religion Foundation notified on BBoard of Education via a December 22 email that said the opening of monthly public meetings with Christian prayer “goes beyond a public school board,” according to Supreme Court rulings and precedents.

The school district is reviewing the matter with its legal counsel, Superintendent Jon Ritchie said, and may discuss the matter at a future board meeting.

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The Freedom From Religion Foundation advocates its cause

Karen Heineman, lawyer for the Freedom From Religion Foundation, said the organization was contacted in October by a parent who lives in the school district and who attended a recent school board meeting which opened with a prayer .

The letter to the board read, “The prayer our complainant witnessed was Christian and ended with ‘our Savior Jesus Christ’,” and noted that the prayer came before the pledge of allegiance. , the first item listed on many school boards agendas.

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Orrville school board member Donna Smith (left) listens to fellow board member Wayne Steiner share her take on masks in schools at a board meeting in September.  Steiner had voted against a temporary mask mandate.

“Board member Wayne Steiner promotes his personal religious beliefs at board meetings and has been hostile to the expression of other religious views,” according to the foundation’s letter.

Heineman said it could have swayed the board vote on mask requirements.

“There had been initial discussions, (the board) seemed to be leaning towards the mask’s mandate. The only board member made his point that basically God decides how long we’re going to be here with or without a mask. And then the vote went the other way.


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Readers Respond: An Argument Against “Pregnant People” https://knz-clan.com/readers-respond-an-argument-against-pregnant-people/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/readers-respond-an-argument-against-pregnant-people/ I challenge Therese Bottomly’s arguments relating to “pregnant people” (“Letter from the Editor: Inclusive Language Enlightens Change in Society,” December 19). It doesn’t matter how some people “identify”. If they are pregnant, they are women, it is only a biological fact. Biology is a science; it is not based on personal identification, but on scientific […]]]>

I challenge Therese Bottomly’s arguments relating to “pregnant people” (“Letter from the Editor: Inclusive Language Enlightens Change in Society,” December 19). It doesn’t matter how some people “identify”. If they are pregnant, they are women, it is only a biological fact. Biology is a science; it is not based on personal identification, but on scientific facts.

Bottomly’s argument that “1.2 million Americans identify as non-binary” does not make sense. It doesn’t matter if it’s “more than the population of the city of Seattle or San Francisco.” It represents less than 0.4% of the American population. And to compare the adoption of Mme with the adoption of “pregnant people” (soon to be “pregnant men”?) Is a slight exaggeration. One refers to stopping the immediate reference to a woman’s marital status, the other to a biological impossibility.

The fact that a government document refers to pregnant people is irrelevant in today’s ultra-politicized atmosphere. I can almost guarantee that if one “ultra-progressive” person in government used this expression, few would have the courage to point out the absurdity of it; they would be afraid of being labeled with all kinds of unappealing adjectives.

Gabriel Farkas, Portland


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Julie Walters on Retirement and The Abominable Snow Baby https://knz-clan.com/julie-walters-on-retirement-and-the-abominable-snow-baby/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 15:01:35 +0000 https://knz-clan.com/julie-walters-on-retirement-and-the-abominable-snow-baby/ Screen legend Julie Walters has decided to end a successful career after recovering from bowl cancer last year and has ruled out a return to our screens in the immediate future. Star Could Send Us Some Christmas Cheer As Star Of Heartwarming Channel 4 Animated Film The abominable snow baby, but she hinted that it […]]]>

Screen legend Julie Walters has decided to end a successful career after recovering from bowl cancer last year and has ruled out a return to our screens in the immediate future.

Star Could Send Us Some Christmas Cheer As Star Of Heartwarming Channel 4 Animated Film The abominable snow baby, but she hinted that it would take a very special project to bring her back to a TV set!


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