Building Creative Hubs for Expression – The New Indian Express

We walked into The Hosteller’s basement, New Friends Colony, on Saturday afternoon with a pink rose in one hand, “The Phosphene” stamped on our inner wrist, and a name badge with our pronouns. As soft tunes played in the background, a number of people were seen browsing through items – made by Delhi-NCR-based artists – such as digital prints, trinkets, stickers and more. , which were neatly stacked on tables in stalls. Visitors – there were many individuals from the queer community and DBAs – flocked to this pop-up exhibition curated by the staff of The Phosphene, a city literary magazine. People came together to shop, connect and watch a series of performances.

a visitor browsing the works of Bani at the Phosphene

Later in the afternoon, we witnessed similar excitement at Janpath’s Informal By Imperfecto, where MozArt, a newly created art platform, hosted a pop-up event. Here, a group of emerging artists from the city have come together to present their creations in order to reach a wider audience. “I look forward to interacting with lots of people and making friends,” commented Tvisha Garg (20), a digital artist from Faridabad.

Attharv Bhat during the event |
ANJANI CHADHA

Except for the event-free phase due to the COVID-induced lockdown, contextual events have gradually become popular post-pandemic. One can notice how each event is carefully curated, making the experience one of a kind for the audience.

Feeding budding creators
Hriday (they/they) from Punjabi Bagh exhibited their digital works for the first time at Phosphene. “Art is very personal and conveys a lot of messages. As a trans person, allow this [through pop-up events] is gorgeous,” they (19) shared. East Delhi resident Tanshi Agrwal, who was at MozArt, echoed Hriday’s thoughts. “If it goes well, I think I’ll be more confident in my work and in the pop-up [events] as a way to showcase art,” the 19-year-old said.

For a long time, art has been perceived as an elitist sphere, often promoting ideas and techniques that exclude the public. In fact, art spaces such as galleries have also been repeatedly criticized for being a zone of exclusion and limitation. These art pop-ups, in a way, help break those restrictions and provide a space for artists without their work being judged or criticized.

A safe sanctuary
Another goal of these pop-up events is that they help create a space that promotes freedom of expression. Pratyn Chakraborty (18), a poet from Shaheen Bagh, recounts his experiences as a queer person. Chakraborty mentioned that he had been to places that prevented him from performing his poetry. However, he said the Phosphene allowed him to not censor space. “I didn’t feel judged here,” he concluded.

We walked into The Hosteller’s basement, New Friends Colony, on Saturday afternoon with a pink rose in one hand, “The Phosphene” stamped on our inner wrist, and a name badge with our pronouns. As soft tunes played in the background, a number of people were seen browsing through items – made by Delhi-NCR-based artists – such as digital prints, trinkets, stickers and more. , which were neatly stacked on tables in stalls. Visitors – there were many individuals from the queer community and DBAs – flocked to this pop-up exhibition curated by the staff of The Phosphene, a city literary magazine. People came together to shop, connect and watch a series of performances. a visitor browsing Bani’s works at the Phosphene Later in the afternoon, we witnessed similar excitement at Janpath’s Informal By Imperfecto, where MozArt, a newly created art platform, hosted a pop-up event. Here, a group of emerging artists from the city have come together to present their creations in order to reach a wider audience. “I look forward to interacting with lots of people and making friends,” commented Tvisha Garg (20), a digital artist from Faridabad. Attharv Bhat during the event | ANJANI CHADHA Except for the event-free phase due to the COVID-induced lockdown, pop-up events have gradually become popular after the pandemic. One can notice how each event is carefully curated, making the experience one of a kind for the audience. Aspiring creators nurturing Hriday (they/them) from Punjabi Bagh exhibited their digital works for the first time at Phosphene. “Art is very personal and conveys a lot of messages. As a trans person, allow this [through pop-up events] is gorgeous,” they (19) shared. East Delhi resident Tanshi Agrwal, who was at MozArt, echoed Hriday’s thoughts. “If it goes well, I think I’ll be more confident in my work and in the pop-up [events] as a way to showcase art,” the 19-year-old said. For a long time, art has been perceived as an elitist sphere, often promoting ideas and techniques that exclude the public. In fact, art spaces such as galleries have also been repeatedly criticized for being a zone of exclusion and limitation. These art pop-ups, in a way, help break those restrictions and provide a space for artists without their work being judged or criticized. A Safe Sanctuary Another purpose of these pop-up events is that they help create a space that promotes freedom of expression. Pratyn Chakraborty (18), a poet from Shaheen Bagh, recounts his experiences as a queer person. Chakraborty mentioned that he had been to places that prevented him from performing his poetry. However, he said the Phosphene allowed him to not censor space. “I didn’t feel judged here,” he concluded.

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